Meet the artist

Sarah Nali

Sarah Nali

I am an illustrative artist as well as an avid photographer. I am very interested in the little details in life that commonly get looked over. I am also interested in modern pop culture (ie. Star Wars, Dr. Who, Lord of the Rings, and anything dinosaurs). I like to work with many different mediums, I am currently focusing on ink for both drawing and painting, watercolor painting, and photography. When I am working with inks and watercolors, I like to leave evidence of what I've done and how I got to my conclusion when creating a piece through what I like to call a "process map". This shows the messy bits that contribute to a beautiful finished work and I believe that it best reflects how art and people have the same entanglement or metaphor -- how they can be a work-in-progress, or a mess, and still be beautiful.

Art has been incredibly important to me as a grounding instrument as I've struggled with severe depression and anxiety for upwards of 17 years. Art has always been something I can run to and use to make sense of things when I feel like I am spiraling. I like to use my art to prompt others to think about (and hopefully begin to admire) how life is built upon little factors that work together that we can’t always see. The best example in my work that I believe describes this is my piece, Eggs-istential Crisis because the piece is geared towards bringing the viewer back to Aristotle's paradoxical philosophy of what came first in life: the chicken or the egg. However, as this is a paradox, the egg is cracked open on top, putting on display what is both the egg in its current state and what it could become if it was given enough time -- the chicken. I believe that this philosophy is an important one to have an understanding of because it accurately depicts how life isn’t solely one thing or another, but dependent on things working together to exist.

I also like to use my art to show that mental illness doesn't have to be something that drowns you if you can focus on the right things. I think that my piece, Into the Void shows how easily we can emotionally and mentally dive into depressive mindsets and get stuck in a loop of thinking or obsessing about the negative contributors in life when we should really focus on the small things we are grateful for. For me, some of these little things are intricate bacteria patterns on petri dishes, how the stars in our sky are always changing but ever constant, the beauty that raindrops hold when they are caught by leaves and branches, and the fact that human beings have the same compositional elements in their bodies as stars do in space.

As a result, I try to actively depict a daily mantra of mine to show others life from my perspective: Life is short, take each day as a new day and take them one at a time; find your silver lining -- even if it's in the little details of life.


Sarah Nali

Major // Minor 2020 photogram on lithofilm

Major // Minor

Alpha // Zulu 2020 photogram on lithofilm

Alpha // Zulu

Into the Void 2019 watercolor, ink, metallic ink on cold press, acid-free watercolor paper

Into the Void

Eggs-istential Crisis 2018 watercolor on cold press, acid-free paper

Eggs-istential Crisis

Heritage: Fika, Lutefisk, and Sankta Lucia 2019 Earthenware

Heritage: Fika, Lutefisk, and Sankta Lucia

The Chosen One 2019 ink, metallic ink on recycled acid-free drawing paper

The Chosen One

//Collide// 2018 watercolor, metallic ink on cold press, acid-free watercolor paper

//Collide//

Untitled 2019 Stoneware

Untitled

Out of Time Dinosaurs: Victorian Pride & Prejudice 2019 acrylic paint, ink on stretched canvas

Out of Time Dinosaurs: Victorian Pride & Prejudice

Out of Time Dinosaurs: Pop Art Dinos 2020 acrylic paint, ink on stretched canvas

Out of Time Dinosaurs: Pop Art Dinos


Meet the artist

Sarah Nali

Sarah Nali

I am an illustrative artist as well as an avid photographer. I am very interested in the little details in life that commonly get looked over. I am also interested in modern pop culture (ie. Star Wars, Dr. Who, Lord of the Rings, and anything dinosaurs). I like to work with many different mediums, I am currently focusing on ink for both drawing and painting, watercolor painting, and photography. When I am working with inks and watercolors, I like to leave evidence of what I've done and how I got to my conclusion when creating a piece through what I like to call a "process map". This shows the messy bits that contribute to a beautiful finished work and I believe that it best reflects how art and people have the same entanglement or metaphor -- how they can be a work-in-progress, or a mess, and still be beautiful.

Art has been incredibly important to me as a grounding instrument as I've struggled with severe depression and anxiety for upwards of 17 years. Art has always been something I can run to and use to make sense of things when I feel like I am spiraling. I like to use my art to prompt others to think about (and hopefully begin to admire) how life is built upon little factors that work together that we can’t always see. The best example in my work that I believe describes this is my piece, Eggs-istential Crisis because the piece is geared towards bringing the viewer back to Aristotle's paradoxical philosophy of what came first in life: the chicken or the egg. However, as this is a paradox, the egg is cracked open on top, putting on display what is both the egg in its current state and what it could become if it was given enough time -- the chicken. I believe that this philosophy is an important one to have an understanding of because it accurately depicts how life isn’t solely one thing or another, but dependent on things working together to exist.

I also like to use my art to show that mental illness doesn't have to be something that drowns you if you can focus on the right things. I think that my piece, Into the Void shows how easily we can emotionally and mentally dive into depressive mindsets and get stuck in a loop of thinking or obsessing about the negative contributors in life when we should really focus on the small things we are grateful for. For me, some of these little things are intricate bacteria patterns on petri dishes, how the stars in our sky are always changing but ever constant, the beauty that raindrops hold when they are caught by leaves and branches, and the fact that human beings have the same compositional elements in their bodies as stars do in space.

As a result, I try to actively depict a daily mantra of mine to show others life from my perspective: Life is short, take each day as a new day and take them one at a time; find your silver lining -- even if it's in the little details of life.